Link to Metals Worksheets

Metals Worksheets


The science of materials is the basis of much recycling knowledge and helps scientists work out how to recycle stuff better. Many of the sorting machines used to separate out recycling rely on scientific principles; for example, metals are separated using magnets.

Metals can be recycled everywhere in Devon. Cans and tins are recycled in kerbside collections (see our District Recycling Sheets) while larger metal household objects can be taken to local Recycling Centres. Find your nearest one on our main Recycling website.

The worksheets on this page will help young people understand the science of the material called metal. We hope doing these activities will create better scientists and more critical thinkers. We know the wicked problems (complex and difficult issues like climate change and biodiversity loss) we are leaving the next generation will need some innovative thinking to solve them!

Downloadable Worksheets


Fast Fashion

Fast Fashion



Use these resources to change your attitude towards fast fashion at school or home to ensure the way you buy, use and discard clothes is as sustainable as possible.

See more External Resources about Clothing and Fast Fashion here: https://zone.recycledevon.org/external-resources/#clothing

Videos


Watch these videos which highlight some of the problems with the fashion industry.

Quiz


A fun, interactive quiz to test your knowledge…


Solutions


Find out about the solutions to our fast fashion problem…


Toggle Content goes here

Toggle Content goes here

Toggle Content goes here

Images of lovely colourful food

Tackling Food Waste

Images of lovely colourful food

Food waste is a major contributor to climate change, through the production of methane when it biodegrades. Up to one billion people worldwide don’t have enough food every day and yet in more developed countries we waste about 1/3 of all food produced. If all food waste was saved then we have the potential to save the carbon equivalent of taking one in five cars off the road. As educators we must make sure students know how to tackle food waste at home.

Large Black Z Our web pages have lots of information about how food waste is recycled.

We have a video for children about what happens to your food waste in Devon.

There are a range of resources available to teach about using up leftovers and budgeting when out food shopping. Here are some of our favourites:

Recycling at Home


Use our Recycling at Home worksheet to help teach about responsibility for the environment as part of PSHE. With the help of the internet or a council recycling leaflet and student’s creativity they can make their own poster that showing their different waste containers, what goes in them, and when they are collected. Then encourage students to do the recycling at home, find out where the containers are stored and help take the recycling out to the street on the day it is collected.

Don’t forget to send us any pictures of any home challenges you tackle at @RecycleDevon on Twitter, Instagram and Facebook!

Download 3Rs at Home Worksheet: Recycling at Home

NOTE: This Activity Worksheet was first released as part of our series of 3Rs at Home worksheets created during the first coronavirus lockdown in Spring 2020, but is a stand-alone activity suitable for home schooling or teaching in-school.

Find related videos and links below:

Find out what district you live in

Click here for more information about your local council recycling service

Download Thank You Recycling Poster

Recycling Wordsearch

students talk through a problem in a team

Financial Awareness

Financial knowledge and decision-making skills use concepts from Maths and Computing to understand how to make decisions about what to buy and how to stay within a budget.

We have developed a project based learning activity to help KS3 and 4 students use real-world examples to practice financial decision-making skills. Our activity is based around reusable versus disposable products.

Comparing Reusable and Disposable Products

There are a variety of reusable products available which have disposable options as well. Use this comparison project to develop student’s budgeting and calculation skills. Many adults find this difficult, so they will develop important financial awareness skills with this engaging activity.

Subject: PSHE, Life Skills, Maths

Spotlight on: Comparison of costs of two options over time

Driving Question: How can I compare two similar products?

students talk through a problem in a team

Process

  1. Hold a discussion about money and budgeting. Ask students what they see their parents doing at home. Discuss ways of saving money, like going to different supermarkets for different offers, or comparing options using a price comparison website.
  2. In groups ask students to brainstorm how many reusable products and their disposable options are available. Ask groups to share. Expect items like face masks, nappies, period products (see our pages on Reusable Period Products), handkerchiefs. More unusual ones might be ear protection, paper towels, toilet paper (family cloths are the reusable option!).
  3. Ask the groups to choose one item to compare. Using computers and iPads ask students to start researching the costs of reusable and disposable items. Supermarket websites will have costs for the most easily available options like disposable nappies and period products. Specialist websites will sell reusable options.
  4. Ask groups to compare the costs over a certain time period. This could be for the first 3 years of a child’s life for nappies or the period of time a person menstruates (about 40 years).
  5. Ask students to prepare a presentation to the rest of the class comparing the costs. Students could also prepare a leaflet for the public or their families. They could even ask the school to send information home with families if they wished to.
  6. Make sure students understand that the cost of products often does not represent their environmental cost, i.e. the cost of disposal of the item – e.g. nappies end up in black bin bags, which are burnt for energy in Devon. This is a very expensive process. Reusable products are better for the environment and can help save money too.

The text of this project based learning activity is also available as a Word document.

Project Based Learning: Comparing Reusable and Disposable Products

Plastic Worksheets

The science of materials is the basis of much recycling knowledge and helps scientists work out how to recycle stuff better. Many of the sorting machines used to separate out recycling rely on scientific principles; for example, some plastics are separated using floating and sinking machines.

Most plastic can be recycled everywhere in Devon. Plastic bottles, tubs and pots are recycled in kerbside collections (see our District Recycling Sheets). Hard plastics like toys and plastic outdoor chairs can be recycled at Household Waste Recycling Centres. Find your nearest one on our main Recycling website.

The worksheets on this page will help young people understand the science of the material called plastic. We hope doing these activities will create better scientists and more critical thinkers. We know the wicked problems (complex and difficult issues like climate change and biodiversity loss) we are leaving the next generation will need some innovative thinking to solve them!


Person in blue plastic gloves holiding a piece of clear plastic with background of scientific looking machine

Downloadable Worksheets

Aluminium Can balancing on its side

Learn a magic trick!

Bored kids? Looking for an activity to try at home this month? Whether you’re home educating your children or just looking for something to do at home with them over the Christmas Holidays why not have a go at our Metal Matters Home Education Activity.

Students will learn a cool magic trick by balancing a can on its side and do some science while they’re at it!

All our Science of Materials Worksheets show children of all ages how magical our materials are and why we should Reduce, Reuse and Recycle them as much as we can. Our precious resources need to become part of a Circular Economy and be used again and again, rather than constantly making new stuff.

(pdf) Download Home Education Worksheet: Can Balancing

(Word) Download Home Education Worksheet: Can Balancing

Visit our Home Education pages for more Activities suitable for Home Learning.

You can see more of our new Science of Materials: Metals worksheets on our Metals Worksheets pages. A new material will be added every half-term, so watch out for the next ones too!

Icons representing digital and media literacy

Media Literacy

We are surrounded by media in lots of different forms, whether it’s through the old style print media like newspapers or magazines, or websites, or social media. They are all written with a certain viewpoint. Every piece of writing has been written with a different agenda and a select audience in mind. In our ever changing and fast moving world we need to learn the skills to access, analyse, evaluate and create media in all its forms so we can gather a balanced view of the world around us and what is happening. This page will help teachers educate about media literacy, using examples from the waste industry, including subjects around the plastic pollution problem and other recent issues.

Watch the BBC Bitesize video on how to evaluate digital information and websites.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/clips/zw8mtfr


The information on this page can also be downloaded as a separate sheet.

Download Media Literacy Information

Four Principles of Digital Literacy:


There are four main principles of digital media literacy. When looking at items online it will help to consider these things:


What is the article about? Can you understand the message, both explicit (what is written about) and implicit (what message is conveyed/implied but left unsaid). What is the purpose of the article/video/picture/video/meme?

All digital media relates to another form of media somehow. What is the source of the article/video/picture/video/meme? Who made it? Where is the information contained in it from? Is it a reputable and verifiable source?

Sharing and passing on the message is critical in our everyday interactions with digital media. Who shared this with you? Was this suggested to you because of something else you clicked on? Who will you share it with? (THINK BEFORE YOU CLICK!)

Choosing what we like and don’t like has taken on a meaning of it’s own in our online lives. We need an awareness of where information has come to us from and who might have curated it for us to read or discover. How is this article/video/picture/video/meme stored and collected?

Questions to ask about media:


It is easy to be fooled by websites, posts or other online media. Use the prompts below to help decipher and decode what different websites or social media is telling you.


  • Who wrote the content?
  • Was it a company? Government? Individual?
  • Think about their possible bias or slant on the subject.
  • Why was it written? Think about what it is saying, both explicitly (plainly) or implicitly (is their a hidden message).
  • Do you trust the author?
  • Is the information out of date?
  • When was it written?
  • Is it believable?
  •     What does the design of the website tell you?
  •     Has it been made professionally?
  •     Are there spelling mistakes and grammatical errors?
  • Does an internet search including the words “fake” or “scam” come up with any hits?
  • Is it a verified source?
  • Where does the website appear in a search engine?
  • What might the ranking of the website in the search engine tell you?
  • Look for promotion of sponsored material or popular sites.
  • Is it promoted by another company or interest group?
  •     Does the website seem fair?

Questions to ask about images:


You can also go further with more research to understand the images that accompany posts and articles and help you decide if what you are seeing has actually happened or has been doctored to appear a certain way.


  •     Who took the picture?
  •     Who published the picture?
  •     Government? Individual?
  •     Think about their possible bias or slant on the subject
  •     Look for the oldest or original picture
  •     Why was it taken?
  •     Was it staged for dramatic effect?
  •     Are the images accurate?
  •     Have they been modified or changed in some way?
  •     Perform a reverse image search to find out the history and background of an image.
  •     Be skeptical, not cynical!
  •     Does the image seem a fair representation of the facts?

Microplastics on Snowdon!

This lesson plan will help students from Y5 to Y8 evaluate and assess some recent news stories from the waste industry, understanding what is going on and what might be happening behind the scenes when we read things online.

Download Lesson Plan on Digital Literacy: Microplastics on Snowdon

Download Powerpoint for Digital Literacy Lesson: Microplastics on Snowdon

The Textiles Conundrum

This lesson plan will help students from Y8 to Y11 evaluate and assess a contemporary waste management issue, understanding the current situation and what might be happening behind the scenes when we read stories and adverts online.

The Textile Industry is the second most polluting industry in the world. Find out more in the Ted Ed lesson here: https://ed.ted.com/on/uRCT8bE3.

Clothing and fashion companies are always trying to sell us more clothes. What can we do when we know that this is unsustainable? Some companies may also try to “greenwash” what they do, so it appears that they are following eco-conscious practices, while continuing to follow practices that cause harm to the environment. Often this means it can be hard to work out whether the company is genuinely trying to work hard to protect the environment, reduce their carbon footprint and reduce waste, or just trying to retain customers and maximise profits.

See the lesson plan below which will help older secondary age students analyse the information that is being given to them and make good choices when it comes to buying and disposing of clothes.

Download Lesson Plan on Digital Literacy: Understanding the textiles industry

Download Info and Question Cards on Digital Literacy: Understanding the textiles industry

Download Powerpoint for Digital Literacy Lesson: Understanding the textiles industry

More Information

There is loads of good quality information out there to understand what the internet and social media is trying to tell you, why you should question what you see sometimes and how to decipher and decode our ever more digital lives.

Here is a Youtube playlist of some useful information about fact checking your social media.

And a useful article about some factchecking websites and there are also some factchecking Twitter feeds like Factcheck.org and Politifact.

Great British September School Clean 2020 banner

New Litter Wordsearch!

Download our new Litter Wordsearch for a 5 minute activity or as an introduction to the Great British September Litter Pick.